“This is a very good program because it is about respecting us as Elders, what our needs are and whether or not we are comfortable with how things are worked out. ….”

– Ironbark program participant

Aboriginal Elders are the keepers of our cultural knowledge, they are the educators in our communities teaching our young, supporting and maintaining connection to country and an integral part of Aboriginal culture.

The Ironbark Project is an Aboriginal healthy ageing research project. It compares two different programs which are run by Aboriginal people in the local community.

What is the Ironbark project?

The Ironbark Project is an Aboriginal healthy ageing research project.  It compares two different programs - The Ironbark: Standing Strong and Tall program (weekly exercise and yarning circle), and the Ironbark: Healthy Community program (a weekly social program).

Both programs run weekly for a year, and are for groups of Aboriginal men and women 45 years and older.

We think these programs will improve older Aboriginal people’s social and emotional wellbeing, strength, mobility and independence, and prevent falls.

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Who can be involved?

We want to work with sites that are urban, rural and some remote communities in NSW, SA and WA. Your service might be an Aboriginal Medical Service, Local Aboriginal Land Council, Aged care service, non government agency or government primary health service.

Contact an Ironbark team member for an information pack.

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IRONBARK SITES

  • Have existing groups for Aboriginal men and women 45 years and older, or can form a group

  • Are led by Aboriginal staff

  • Have a space people can easily get to

The Ironbark Programs

Ironbark: Standing Strong and Tall


  • A weekly class that runs for around 1.5 hours
  • 30 – 45 minutes of light exercise and 30 – 45 minutes of a yarning circle
  • Includes morning tea
  • The program will run for a year, with additional weekly home exercise recommended

Ironbark: Healthy Community


  • A weekly group that runs for about 1.5 hours
  • Flexible in content, it aims to be a chance to yarn and discuss topics important to the group
    and socialise
  • Includes morning tea

What you can expect

We train and fund your team to deliver one of the Ironbark programs, and collect data.

A locally based site manager will coordinate around 10 - 15 Aboriginal people to participate in the Ironbark program each week. Your service might have an existing group that could join the project, or you could form a new group.

We will train a program facilitator to deliver the program. We will provide all equipment, manuals, handouts and training needed.

Ironbark Overview
What is Ironbark
More Information

Our Partners


This project is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council